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after the commission. as a limited government person i do not think we should stay in positions forever, but at the wee time i love my job and have a lot important work to do. >> this past week, commissioner robert mcdowell and chairman julius czajkowski announced their resignations from the fcc. hear more on monday night from "the communicators," at 8:00 eastern on c-span 2. >> wednesday, british chancellor torch osborne unveiled the government's proposed tax and spending plans to members of the british house of commons. he told members 600,000 more jobs will be added this year according to forecasters. corporation tax will be cut to 20%, the lowest tax rate than any other economy in the world. in his one-hour speech, chancellor osborne announced measures aimed at assisting small business owners, first- time homebuyers, and british veterans. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. mr. deputy speaker, this is a budget for people who aspire to work hard and get on. it's a budget for people who realise there are no easy answers to problems built up over many years. just the painst
.s. government. most informed observers would agree, i think, that as a result of our government counter-terrorism efforts, spanning both the bush and obama administration's, and which having targeted lethal force against known individuals, the u.s.:it is safer today from a terrorist attack launched by al qaeda from overseas. some would say if it is not broke, don't fix it. the problem, however, is that the american public is suspicious of executive power shrouded in secrecy. in the absence of an official picture of what our government is doing and by what authority, many in the public envisioned the worst. they see dark images of civilian and military national security personnel in the basement of the white house, acting as prosecutor, judge, jury, and executioner. going down a list of americans deciding for themselves who shall live and who shall die, pursuant to a process and by standards no one understands. our government in speeches given by the attorney general and myself makes official disclosures of large amounts of information about its efforts and the legal basis for those effo
to no state. attacking states, laying low state governments, depleting the taliban, defeating al qaeda -- iraq. it will not stop it because terrorism, like sustainability, like markets, are interdependent in their character. so what we have created in the beginning of the 21st century is a deep asymmetry between the challenges we face and the political response the political institutions we have to respond to that. every challenge is interdependent, global cross frontier, and the primary political actors that respond are bounded, frontiered, independent nation states. and in that asymmetry, you can see the dysfunction of the modern world. we watch, for example, starting four or five years in copen hagueen and going through mexico city and dubai and nations came together to renew the kyoto protocol already out of term of the date. at least to embrace that antiquated document and failing to do so. and going home and saying that is because our sovereignty says china said the u.s., says now canada, even leaders on keogh know doesn't permit us to monitor, to report to international body, doesn't pe
, and a prime minister who has managed to establish control over a fractious government? or is it all those things? this is not a discussion rooted in the past. we will not relive the wmd questions. we will not dwell on the mistakes of the coalition authority, and we will not debate the surge. andill look at iraq today where it is headed. a has been little of that in the 10 years media coverage, even though it is a far more relevant question for policy makers and the public today. with that, because you did not come here to hear me today, that we introduce the plan all. you on the who they are. you know their contributions to the efforts to stabilize iraq. to my right is ambassador ryan crocker, who is the kissinger senior fellow at the el universal. he has served recently as our ambassador to afghanistan, his long career included ambassadors for iraq as well as our ambassador to pakistan, syria, kuwait, and lebanon. from may to august of 2003, he served as the government's director for the coalition provisional authority in baghdad, and his career in the foreign service included a tour in
reportedly showed damage after the government's artillery shells in an area of the bacchus province -- of damascus province. 's opposition has elected a new interim prime minister who it hopes will unify the area. ghassan hitto's first task will be to form a cabinet. who is he? used is 50 years old and to be an it manager. he is american educated and has u.s. citizenship. he moved to turkey to coordinate opposition aid. >> syria's new prime minister, as far as the opposition in exile as well as their international supporters are concerned. ghassan hitto's first priority, forming a cabinet. based inside syria, the interim government will need to establish legitimacy with people living in the 60% of the country estimated to be under assad forces.ti- >> tomorrow there will be a speech, and you will hear in introduction of the highlights .f the plan for the near future >> from the general who represents the majority of the armed groups fighting the assad regime, there is a promise of loyalty. >> we in the syrian army look to the government as a political umbrella for us, and we can ask
european union and the government of cyprus has agreed on a euro package to salvage the countries tanks. many are still skeptical. a call for politicians to be held accountable. as this nation prepares to face years of austerity to meet the terms laid out by its international lenders. >> we will be going live to our correspondents in just a moment. first, this report. >> cyprus's a banks have been closed for 10 days now. the two mainlanders will be shut on thursday. smaller banks will open in the morning. the to be a bank holiday anyway. went ahead as planned. celebrations are muted. everyone knows there are hard times ahead. >> there is no other choice. i cannot say we rejoice, but if this is the only possible way, then i want to assure you that we will be very resilient. >> it is goodbye to the low-tax business model that attracted lots of money a broad, a huge number of inking jobs will go. the country's a second-biggest bank, lockheed, will be submerged into the bank of cyprus. that's a, too, will be radically structured. euros will remain frozen. 30% will be taken to help sor
was crossed. at thisote without point having all the facts there me, that we know syrian government has the capacity to carry out chemical weapon attacks. inknow that there are those the syrian government who have expressed a willingness to use chemical weapons, if necessary, to protect themselves. of anyeply skeptical claim that, in fact, it was the opposition that use chemical weapons. everybody who knows the facts of chemical weapons stockpile inside syria as well as the syrian government could abilities, i think would question those claims. i know they are floating out there right now. point is, once we establish the facts, i have made clear the use of chemical weapons is a game changer. host: in the newspaper this morning, and israel -- this is from a cnn interview -- host: i want to get your reaction and your thoughts on u.s. policy towards syria. the numbers are on your screen -- host: you can also post a comment on facebook or send a twitter. you can send an e-mail, journal@c-span.org. the washington post, obama warns syria on chemical arms -- host: the british-based syrian obse
. >> shannon: a scary thought, imagine the government compensating 40% of your savings. this is "special report." >> shannon: good evening. i'm shannon bream in for bret baier. citizens are going to feel a major pinch, something unthinkable in this country. greg palkot has the lead story tonight. >> the people of cyprus got the news they wanted but it will to be happy about. they have been saved from bankruptcy. one of the biggest banks will be shut down in part of a broader, economic slowdown here. >> it's too bad. >> bad. >> why? >> too bad. >> small depositors would be protected but people with bank account of $130,000 or more could see 40% or more seized by the both to pay for the bail-out. >> our deposits are not safe. >> european union officials defended the approach and called it the new template to handle future euro zone problems. stock markets said to fall in part op that news. european union says it cares. >> we will do everything possible. >> with the the merge european union funds assured some are set -- some banks set to reopen tuesday. they are going to try to prevent run on the
, 30 employees of the united states government you have been sequestered from public view for six months, four of them injured. what is your reaction? >> where they bury the survivors? lou: it has really been just exactly that. >> and the liberace, tucker, i don't think and stole the election. and now our soldiers are getting killed as a result of what he says. after ten years of sacrifice. >> aren't you glad obama pull the troops also the good afghanistan right? >> by the way, what happens to the mass of weapons of mass destruction jack next week is the ten year anniversary. we're still looking for those. lou: it makes you wonder about just where we are with their policy. you will leave about $35 billion worth of material and equipment in afghanistan. at least that appears to be the plan right now. you get the last word here. >> i hope that the prime minister netanyahu on tuesday or wednesday brings out his little round bomb with the red line on it and says, see, i told you so. lou: and not quite sure what that meant, but i will give you the last word. james, joyous, thank you so
and focus on that. the system separate from the government eliminate the model with the private sector benefit from the government guarantee come in many government race, private sector rewards. nature the secondary market was privately financed capital we insist on government funds. the maximum cutting a private sector was not the part of the bill portion of it. historically housing right to recovery. we need an alternative rapidly. thank you. >> the china recognizes general from california, mr. sherman for a minute and a half. >> in the 1930s detroit dat is no federal and home finance it did not work out. then we tried the gse model for organizations run by those reported for profit had a full implicit guarantee. so they took risks to benefit shareholders on the taxpayers, so that is not something we should return to. i'll agree with the chairman but if that's as far as it goes. but i do think we need a federal agency for more than one involved in the market. otherwise we'll see the end of the 30 year mortgage at fixed rates available to average middle-class families. what percentage
government officials have instructed the operator of the fukushima plant to install more backup power. employees struggled for more than a day. >> reporter: we told them to supply multiple power sources and implement other efforts as quickly as possible to restore public confidence in the safety of the plan. the handling has greatly damaged public trust. >> tepco officials failed to report the problem promptly. they ordered them to improve their risk management. it took crews more than day to restore power to all the cooling systems. >>> march 20th anniversary. iraqi leaders remain confidence that renewed oil production will help pave the way for prosperity. they are already investing more in the region to meet growing energy demand around the world. >> reporter: the ground beneath the deserts of southern iraq hold some of the world's largest untapped oil deposits. decades of war and sanctions left the country's oil industry in a state of disrepair. but multinational corporations have returned to start new oil production. this is the oil field in southern iraq. i'm standing here on a
's consider working together on areas to change how the government does business and give more value to the taxpayer while we get spending under control. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from georgia, mr. arrow, for five minutes. mr. barrow: mr. speaker, i rise today to urge my colleagues to join me in support of house joint resolution 33 which would reshape the way washington operates. because congress has failed to do its job to find the spending cuts we need to replace the sequester, folks all across this country, including folks in my district in georgia, will pay the price. unfortunately in washington there are rules that prevent members of congress from being penalized for not doing their jobs. the constitution doesn't protect the folks at home so why should it protect the pay of members of congress? the 27th amendment of the constitution was written to prevent members of congress from giving themselves pay increases, but lately it's been used as a shield to prevent a congressional pay cut. my proposal, house joint resolutio
of a managed business or a managed government. i guess that would be saying that it's not a managed government. now, when we took up the budget in committee last week, i offered an amendment to strike the language that provided for the fast-track tax increase process. my amendment was meant to ensure that the tax reform would be conducted in a bipartisan manner to generate a more efficient, fairer and simpler tax code and spur economic growth rather than raise revenue through legislation that can be passed with a simple majority here in the senate. a simple majority vote would ensure that the minority party's views would receive little, if any, consideration. we'd have no input. debate time and the number of amendments that could be offered to improve the legislation would also be limited. we need to have an open process where all members can have their voices heard. we simply need to stop deal making and start legislating. we've had this system around here for awhile where we work from contribed crises that hav have -- contribed crises that have very specific dates in which the sky falls and
government that any powerful weapon will be secured and destroyed. tois our response ability determine whether this can be done that ensures arms will not fall into terrorist organizations. i'm encouraged the syrian opposition chose the prime minister for exile yesterday. time is of the essence. there are difficult decisions that must be made in the days and weeks ahead. we continue to push for un security council resolution. do we provide military advisers and training? do we provide direct military assistance? if so, what kind? can assad be pushed to accept any negotiated conflict? the use of chemical weapons -- makes this more pressing. the use of chemical weapons by this regime would be horrific. 70,000 slaughtered syrians is terrific. horrific. the discussions we have in this committee are interesting. the fact that this is hard cannot stop us from acting. you and your colleagues know better than anyone there are no easy answers. inaction is not an option. i look forward to your testimony and i yield back. thank you. >> thank you. three minutes to the chairman of the middle east s
on the pump. we also realize between the state and federal government a lot of us are paying 40-plus cents a gallon to build the road that we're wearing out with the gas we put in. that's a user's fee. when i came here and break this down and asked the question, of tax/user rth of gas fee, 18.3 cents a gallon, $1 of that, how much of that actually goes into roads and bridges? and i'll tell you it adds up like this -- then we reduce it a little bit on this number. three cents out of that dollar went for trails for bike trails, snowmobile trails and that sort of thing. 3%. there was a one time $16 million in one of our appropriation bills to do -- to clean graffiti off of the walls, retaining walls in new jersey. and i thought, can't they get their prisoners out there with a wire brush to do that? and 28% going for environmental arciological -- interest, looking for arrowheads and endangered species. can't somebody pay for that rather than the people driving on the roads? when you add davis-bacon to that, another 20%, 22%, so you have 3% for trails, you have 28% for our achepologicl and env
control over a fractious government? or is it all those things? this is not a discussion rooted in the past. we will not relive the wmd questions. we will not dwell on the mistakes of the coalition authority, and we will not debate the surge. we will look at iraq today and where it is headed. a has been little of that in the 10 years media coverage, even though it is a far more relevant question for policy makers and the public today. with that, because you did not come here to hear me today, that we introduce the plan all. all on the who they are.-- know who they are. you know their contributions to the efforts to stabilize iraq. to my right is ambassador ryan crocker, who is the kissinger senior fellow at the el sity. sal.-- yale univer he has served recently as our ambassador to afghanistan, his long career included ambassadors for iraq as well as our ambassador to pakistan, syria, kuwait, and lebanon. from may to august of 2003, he served as the government's director for the coalition provisional authority in baghdad, and his career in the foreign service included a tour in
by the japanese government owns the remaining 40%. about 2,400 people work here around the clock. engineers from pakistan and bangladesh work with colleagues from malaysia, japan and iraq. >> japanese count. all right. eight count, please. all right. >> reporter: every morning, workers exercise before heading to the construction site. it's an idea implemented by the japanese employees to foster a sense of community among workers with different languages and cultures. kazuhiro ouwai from japan oversees the on-site work flow. he instructs the workers on safety procedures. they speak to each other in english, but all have different accents. communication often takes time. >> what? >> projection. >> protection? >> projection. >> translator: one of my priorities is to make sure no one is hurt here. safety is very important for us. >> reporter: officials from the joint venture have also started on-site vocational training. instructors teach six subjects, including english and i.t. skills. so far, 340 people have participated. some have started working at the site. >> translator: i want to study englis
of government, government-run pensions, the unionized government work force and bobby jindal with school choice. he's planning this year to abolish the corporate and individual income tax, moving in a very different direction than the national democrats want to and winning elections with that approach. so there's a lot to be learned both by the failure of the romney campaign and the senate races and the successes the republicans have had at the state level. >> host: and we're taking your calls in this segment with grover norquist with americans for tax reform. the phone lines are open. democrats, 202-585-3880. republicans, 202-585-3881. independents, 202-585-3882. grover norquist known as an expert on some of these budget issues. you bring up the senate budget that we saw from budget chairwoman patty murray last week with. talk about that and how you think it compares to paul ryan's budget. >> guest: there are two major differences. they certainly go in different directions. the paul ryan budget balances in ten years and does not raise taxes. patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxe
on the cost of government and government run pension, unionized government workforce and bobby jindal with school choice. he is planning to abolish the corporate individual income tax moving in a very different direction the national democrats want to and winning elections with that approach. there is a lot to be learned both by the failure of the romney campaign in the senate races in the success of the republicans have had at the state level. >> host: we are taking your calls with grover norquist with americans for tax reform. our farmland or open democrats (202)585-3880 and republicans (202)585-3881. grover norquist known as an expert on some of these budget issues. you bring up the senate budget that we saw from budget chairwoman patty murray last week. talk about that and how you think it compares to paul ryan's budget? >> there are two major differences and they certainly going different directions. paul ryan's budget balances in 10 years and is not raise taxes and patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxes $1.5 trillion over the next decade. what the democrats and pa
, and government accountants now list climate change as a threat to our fiscal stability. now, today, as we enter the passover and easter season and as catholics the world over celebrate the selection of a new pope, we turn to voices of faith. they, too, call upon us. they call upon us to heed the moral imperatives of protecting creation and seeking justice for all people. they call upon us to reflect on our faith, on our relationship to our world and each other and on our responsibility to future generations. and they call upon us as president obama reminded us in his inaugural address to preserve our planet commanded to our care by god. i lay no claim to religious authority, but i must believe this -- something that harms others, something that disturbs god's creation, something that stands on lies and greed, protecting that must not be consistent with god's will. in his 2010 world day of peace message entitled "if you want to cultivate peace, protect creation," pope benedict xvi called upon the faithful, and i quote -- "to protect the environment and to safeguard natural resources and the clim
resolution 8, setting forth the congressional budget for the united states government for fiscal year 2014, revising the appropriate budgetary levels -- mrs. murray: i ask unanimous consent the reading be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: i ask any time in quorum call be equally divided. i ask no amendments be in order for the remainder of today's consideration of s. con. res. 8. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: i ask unanimous consent the use of calculators be permitted on the floor during consideration of the budget resolution. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: i ask unanimous consent that emily sharp and michael brenson, detailees to the budget committee, be granted floor privileges for consideration of the budget resolution. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: i ask staff be permitted to make technical changes to the resolution as necessary consistent with adoptions of the senate amendment including calculating the associated change under se
do not know of a family, i do not know of other units of government that as they're trying to wrestle with this question confine themselves to only looking at one side of the balance sheet. but that's what the house budget does. you know, i was thinking about this approach and this question about deficits not long ago, and it struck me that when i look at myself in a mirror, madam president, i always wish that i was thinner. i always wish i was thinner. but i've never once looked in a mirror and wished i was weaker. an all-cuts approach is like looking in a mirror and wishing your weaker because an all-cuts approach placks yo makes you wen education, weaker in defense, by laying people off in jobs, it makes you weaker because your unemployment rate is higher. it is like looking in the mirror and wishing your weaker. we have to be stronger. can we make cuts? sure we can and we have and we'll make more. but we ought to be focused on being stronger, about growing the economy and growing jobs. and that's why the approach that the senate takes is the right approach. because by utilizing re
in the world, but we will make sure there is a record contrast to the government. across theevealed professions, would the prime minister agree that now is the time to look into nursing and whether we should get back to the patient's bedside? >> i think the right hon. gentleman makes an important point. i do not think we want to see de profession was asian. we have seen huge improvements, but i think we have to get back to making sure the patient care is at the heart of nursing. you cannot be a good nurse without those things, and i think we need to return to those values. >> i do not expect you to go into full details. >> when we must get out of this side chamber of using the word you. you refers to the chair. >> i do not expect the prime minister to know the full details against the background, does he think is fair with a 1% increase while they have been at 5%? >> but as a matter of house authorities. the point i would make is public frozen of 1%,have and we do think that is fair. the extraordinary position is a support at 1% increase for public-sector workers, but they think people on where
by the intelligence agencies of governments who did not support my decision to remove saddam and it is true that much of the intelligence turned out to be wrong. >> warner: a report released this month put the cost of iraq's reconstruction at more than $60 billion so far. that on top of 1.7 trillion in estimated war costs according to a recent study by brown university. today some baghdad residents spoke of little progress and expressed anger at the united states. >> the americans did not do anything when they came to iraq. they granted freedom to iraq? what freedom are they talking about? >> warner: in washington, president obama issued a statement marking the anniversary saying he joined in paying tribute to all who served and sacrificed in one of our nation's longest wars. earlier i spoke to jane arraf a reporter earlier, i spoke to jane arraf, a reporter for al-jazeera english and the christian science monitor, about today's violence in baghdad and life in post-war iraq. welcome jane. what is known about who or what's behind today's car bombings and suicide attacks? >> well, the finger, judy, is
putting members on the government payroll. little traction has gained despite high-profile controversies. as i mentioned earlier, a saide ago, jesse jackson kim my wife's company work for the campaign? opinion was that yes, she can, unless -- as long as certain things are met. we know jesse jackson pled guilty to misusing thousands of dollars in campaign funds for personal use. he clearly lost -- crossed the line. i think people are starting to think, maybe we should once again revisit what is happening, where is the line was -- with personal use? a few years earlier, there was a lot of scrutiny when the california sensitive -- , his wife'sve company was getting a 50% commission for his campaign. .- 15% commission people got caught up in the larger investigation into the lobbying scandal. he was never formally charged with wrongdoing, but that was an episode where people said earning commissions, is that appropriate? ?ost: what was the end result guest: nothing has changed. it is still legal. the whole compensation system is determined by the member of congress and his employees. or her
that it remains, quote, quite concerned that assad's government will resort to nonconventional weapons. that doesn't tell us whether they have today, but they remain quite concerned that the government will. now, james just mentioned, it was just last august that president obama issued a warning, and as i mentioned, about chemical weapons in syria. no matter which side used them, here is some of that. >> we cannot have a situation where chemical or biological weapons are falling into the hand of the wrong people, and we have been very clear to the assad regime, but also to other players on the ground that a red line for us is-- we start seeing a whole bunch of chemicals weapons being moved around or utilized. that would change my calculus. >> megyn: coming up later this hour, colonel oliver north with the breaks news and what the united states of america might do, might have to do in the wake of the statements by president obama, if the chemical weapons claims prove true. we've got more breaking news this time from the investigation into the deaths of seven marines during a training exercise in ne
is this new tone going to be translated into the hard work of actually governing the church? there, of course, the challenges are considerably more steep >> ifill: we continue our series of stories about the middle east, margaret warner reports on the divide among the two leading palestinian factions, and its impact on the quest for peace. . >> it is really a divide over power. who's goi toontl what and what's going to be in a stronger position to win the palestinian people and who's going to have the narrative on its side? >> woodruff: and we examine a dramatic shift in public opinion with a majority of americans supporting same sex marriage. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated the idethaall peopleeserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting
be exaggerating slightly. but in all seriousness that the challenges of the government, which will are always going to exist. they seem to be more difficult than they were a decade ago. i am wondering if you can talk about what changed and what can reverse those trends. >> had is my story and i'm sticking to it, that things were perfect. partly, we were dealt with a series of crisis and we had an impeachment crisis, we had the 9/11 attack, we an anthrax attack in my office. when you have crisis like that it brings people together. partly it was the environment and the sicks that we had to confront -- circumstances that we had to cold front. as nk what has changed is she said we would work longer weeks and people were there for longer periods of time. the venues for communication were at hand. she will remember this well. we used to have two lunch tables that were just for senators and you sit family style. people would have lunch together. for whatever reason that lunchroom was closed. we used to have social events where we getting together and one was around our spouses and we would salute
relationship with the turkish government. it's a completely different world. it's completely opposite. when their armed forces show up, it's not really lacked upon as a good thin. this is why i want to say thank you to our military that's here today, to the army, the navy, the military in general, the marines, the coast guard, even i saw a couple air force running around here yesterday. the fact that you are here and you are in san francisco and you do this every year, it says a lot. because we lack at -- look at this as a good week. we have a great working relationship and after being there and seeing that it's not a good relationship and people get really, really tense when the guys in green show up, it makes me appreciate what we have all the more. there's one other thing i really appreciate, by the way, and i'll direct this to general speese being the trainer that he is, i got a whole new appreciation for muzzle discipline back there. i appreciate the fact that we drill that into our personnel that don't point anything you don't want to shoot at. because there's one point i was actu
and this government, not very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. i would say that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of meetings over flights. iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. guest: a whole concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to the north and in syria they see it disintegrating. weapons are flowing into the regime of the time. if we discussed the threat to iran stabilizing, weapons would also be a threat to the united states and its interest in the region. host: independent line, florida, welcome to the program. caller: welcome, gentlemen. i would like to posit, if i may, we are talking about netanyahu and israeli intransigence when it comes
the threat of a government shutdown next week. not shutting down the whole federal government used to be the kind of thing you could reasonably expect from your congress, the kind of thing they get done as a matter of course. under house speaker john boehner, not shutting down the government has become a notable achievement for this congress. mozle top on that. a low bar. >>> house republicans also voted today again for the paul ryan budget. democrats are very excited about that because they plan to use that vote against republicans in campaign ads for the next election. we have the one and only ezra klein here momentarily to sort out what's important about what they just voted on in congress and whether we just avoided one of the cliff slash ceilings clash crisis congress now schedules for us every few weeks and whether the way they avoided this next one is itself important. there's a lot going on in the news. we have a lot ahead. we begin tonight with late breaking and rather surprising news from the democratic leader in the senate, senator harry reid. following two days of angry
use its airspace to shuttle weapons and soldiers to the syrian government >> for those of us engaged in the effort to see president assad step down and a see a democratic process take hold with a transitional government government according to the geneva communique, for those of us engaged in that effort, anything that supports president assad is problematic. bill: so iran claims the flights contain humanitarian supplies. conor powell in the middle east bureau in jerusalem. first of all who is behind the car bomb, the car bomb hit on the rebel commander? >> reporter: so often is the case, bill, really tough to get accurate information coming out of syria. but it is not clear if it was the syrian regime that launched this assassination attempt or if it was sort of opposition rebel fact -- faction that may have launched attack on the colonel of the he is reportedly in stable condition in turkey after the attack. he was one of the original founders of the free syrian army. it has been somewhat marge alized last several months. the colonel was never able to. the attack occurred while tou
. but in all seriousness let's agree that the challenges in government that will always exist seem to be more difficult to surmount today than they were a decade ago and i'm wondering if you can talk about what has change add whand can reverse those trend. >> that is my story and i'm sticking to it that things were perfect. there were a lot of things. we dealt with a series of crisis. we had an impeachment crisis. we had a 9/11 crisis. we had an an thrax attack in my office. when you have crisis like that it brings people together. i think partly it was the circumstances and the environment we had to confront. devissive had very times. the schedule has changed a lot. we would work longer weeks and people were there for a longer period of time. the venues for communication were much more readily at hand. we had -- we used to have two lunch tables that are just for senators and you'd is it family style and people would have lunch together. and for whatever reason that lunchroom was closed. we used to have social events where we get together and one was around our spouses and we'd salute or spo
, the u.s. government finally got out of the prison business in afghanistan transferring control of the prison and afghan prisoners at bagram. the ceremony took place after secretary of state john kerry met with the afghan president. karzai accused the u.s. recently of company lookedding with the taliban to undermine his government. he insisted as a matter of nothing samplety that the u.s. seized control of the prison and it's prisoners. the u.s. has been reluctant to give up control prisoners included taliban leaders. with president obama planning to end the u.s. combat role by the end of 2014 and the new security deal and an afghan president still pending kerry said this: >> you i think stand on the brisk of a remarkable legacy for having brought afghanistan through an amazingly difficult time. i believe that the roadmap ahead is going to be very clear and constructive. john: what happens to the prisoners who were tortured and those still held. we are joined by glenn grenwold. what a pleasure to have you back on the show. >> great to be back. >> the prison, what kind of place i
they are eating a larger portion of americans' paychecks and the government's budget. if we continue on our current path, the medicare trust fund will be insolvent by 2024. and medicare and medicaid will grow from 24% of the federal budget to almost 30%, crowding out other needed investments. we have to reduce health care costs in both the private sector and public sector in order to ensure america remains competitive in a global market, but there is a right way to reform our health care system and there is a wrong way. with all due respect, mr. ryan's path is the wrong way. mr. ryan's plan for medicare and medicaid misses the point. his solution simply shifts the costs from government to patients rather than reducing health care costs. under the ryan budget, seniors would pay as much as $1,200 more each year by 2030 and $6,000 more by 2050. for over half of medicare beneficiaries with incomes less than $21,000, a $1,200 increase is a huge piece of their budget. he also proposes block granting medicaid, which would cut medicaid funding by approximately $700 billion over the next decade and
of the state legislatures, governor's mansions, and there's a difference between state government and the federal government. the absurdity in a state capital, that we did not have a budget for three years, yet here in washington the senate did not pass a budget for three years and the president just not serious about what americans think is the biggest problem of that country. they do not even have a budget for three years? state government, closer to the people, has to get things done. i used to tell trent lott, the difference between governors and senators is senators talk about doing things and governors do things. there's a lot of truth to democrat governors as well. their party is so committed to washington that you do not see many of these governors who are willing to talk the way republican governors are about how we do a better job at the state level. there's much more bipartisanship. i like to think i had a relative success will governorship, but eight of my eight years of governor, i have a democrat house majority, and seven of my years, i had a democrat senate majority
reverse mortgage today, you'll learn the benefits of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ >> all right. check it out. because punxsutawney phil is a wanted animal. an ohio prosecutor is not happy with the famed groundhog's prediction of an early spring. like much of the northwest and mideast it's frigid in the buckeye state and the prosecutor says he wants the ultimate, the death penalty. >> it's definitely not spring, it's a snowstorm and temperatures in the teens and when i came to work in the wind and the cold, i said to myself something's wrong with phil, you know? punxsutawney has some answers he has to give. i'm going to indict phil and taking the death penalty because let's face it phil is already behind bars with a life sentence. what else is left? >> before you write to complain, the prosecutor admits he has fun and the story has legs. here is a copy of the of
. as a global fleet operator serving both commercial and government customers, reliability and continuity of service are our highest priorities. whether it's uav operations over afghanistan or the final game of the ncaa tournament or financial statements that have to be transferred securely around the world, um, we know that our customers expect flawless performance. to deliver this level of performance, we have to daily deal with a range of threats. probably a highest priority for us today is radio frequency interference. many times it's accidental, sometimes intentional. space debris and other challenges of space flight, cyber attacks, solar weather, space systems reliability, the fact that we today don't have an affordable technical solution for refueling and repairing satellites on orbit and last but not least, an international launch industry that's far from robust. now, our economy depends on the ability to create and instantly distribute vast amounts of data around the planet. space-based platforms have become a vital link in the national and global economies, and they're essential
taxes taken out of the pockets of hardworking american families, more government spending which adds to the trillions of dollars in debt that will be handed down to the next generation. our friends on the other side of the aisle talk about a balanced approach, but they refuse to even balance their own budget. our vision calls for a stop to washington's failed policies and reckless spending. it says american families and small businesses understand you can't spend more than you take in. you need to balance your budget, and it's time for washington to do the same. this vision seeks to protect the things that we value most, to keep the promises we made to our seniors, to our veterans. i'm the son of a u.s. marine. while at the same time allowing us to leave a better future for our kids and our grandkids, that's the vision i want to work toward and that's why i'm proud to support the house budget committee's proposal which we'll be voting on later this week. this isn't about passing a budget for one year, just one time. this is about creating lasting solutions that help grow our economy
organizations that do competency training and in many cases have partnered with the federal government and has tripled in size since the affordable care act at hhs has been interested in making sure those young starting out providers have the opportunity to get cultural competency training. many trainers do that in various parts of the country. another major resources the joint commission. my parents are health care providers, so why not all about sometimes a little bit of attention between the standards set out and how providers feel they are actually equipped to meet the standards. when the commission establishes new standards that could nondiscrimination on the basis of orientation identity started a project to make cultural competency materials were widely available so clinicians thought that they have the tools to make that change. there's a monograph from the joint commission that pulls together resources for mayra has mentioned for the others. >> hi, i work with whitman walker held and i'm happy to say they were often the anti-cascade remedy. here we do to a thick work in the community.
to fund the federal government for the rest of the fiscal year. testifying about the ongoing two year civil war in syria. that live hearing starts at 9:45 eastern. this week marks the 10th anniversary of the start of the iraq war. in 45 minutes we will talk with california representative barbara lee, who opposed u.s. military action in iraq. and a congressman who served as a u.s. air force reserve chaplin, we will get his perspective on the war and veterans' issues. will, a virginia senator join us as part of our spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcome to the washington journal. the federal reserve chairman holds his news conference with .eporters u.s. aid officials testify on syria. the commerce panel hears from ,he faa about sequestration and a hearing on domestic use of drones. all those events and more on c- span.org. 10 years ago today marks the us- led invasion into iraq. that is where we begin this morning to get your take on the 10th anniversary. here
responsibility for security to the afghan government. chief washington correspondent james rosen joins me live now. james, bring us up to date. >> reporter: good morning. every leader between u.s. leaders and hamid karzai seems to be fraught with tension and this one is no different. aides say secretary kerry's talks will not dwell on the karzai's allegations that the u.s. and taliban are conspiring to weaken the afghan nation. rather they will discuss security concerns as the u.s. and nato mission in afghanistan winds down over the next 29 months and the need for transparency and fairness in the upcoming elections. for the first time in 12 years hamid karzai will not appear on the ballot. over the weekend jon mentioned secretary kerry met with another leader that. iraqi's leader, nouriel malaki. he wants iran to stop using iraqi airspace to deliver foreign fighters to the fighters and the regime in damascus. >> may made it clear members of congress and people in america are increasingly watching what iraq is doing and wondering how it is that a partner in the efforts for democracy and a partn
, to the prestige and credibility of the u.s. government are daunting and dismaying if we found the wmd it would have been different. it totally would have been different but we didn't. >> sure. right. >> so are the american people more likely to question the challenge of this country being capable and on a proper premise to go into war? >> absolutely. i mean, those poll numbers that you cited way back when, ten years ago, were reflective of what the american people were told by its government, by its president, its secretary of state, its secretary of defense. the case was made for going to war with iraq. you know, in a time of war the american people rally around the president. but as more information came out, as more facts and corrections of the record came out, the american people saw that they were in essence lied to about getting into a war, not one of necessity but one of choice. and so i think going forward, particularly with the saber rattling with iran and what's being talked about with north korea and its belligerence, the american people are going to be very cautious. i should say m
the russian government hazardous to your health? the mysterious death of a one-time billionaire. and the pop culture lead. the white house blowing up, commander in chief held at gun point. where is hollywood obsessed at putting the president in peril. ? we start, of course, with our national lead. for years we've watched court cases that were always destined to end up before the u.s. supreme court, setting precedents that will determine once and for all whether, in the u.s., gay and lesbian couples can legally marry. and now the time is here. the cases have arrived. tomorrow the nine justices will hear arguments over california's proposition 8, the law that voters passed in 2008 banning same-sex marriage in california. and on wednesday the court will hear a separate case challenging the defense of marriage act, which defined marriage as between one man and one woman. signed into law in 1996 by president clinton who now supports the overturning of that law. at least one of the nine on the court has a personal connection to this issue, chief justice john roberts has a cousin from san francisco
. there are issues relating to the loss of the proprietary information, if they share it with the federal government. we are working through those but if we are to be successful in this realm, we have to develop mechanisms of channeling information between the thought -- between the private sector and federal enclave to participate and the bedside attacks and identify those responsible for those attacks and to make certain they are deterred from the additional attacks. >> thank you. it seems it is a question what can be done now and if this are you really from a good relationship with the private sector? thank you bear much. >> i have heard this is a growing concern about gangs in the u.s. military. does the dod participate in the national gang intelligence center? >> i would have to check to the the personnel assigned. i do know that we were work -- we work cooperatively with the military to address things that may be on the feet and also in the military. particularly in cases where there is indication the gang activity is not mullah gated to just the community -- is not relegated just to the commu
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